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26th Annual BCLT/BTLJ Symposium: The Emergent Right to Repair - Competition Issues

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

In years past, consumers didn’t think twice about taking a broken car or toaster to a local repair shop or even fixing it themselves. But with today’s software-enabled products, consumers can no longer take those options for granted. In response to legal and technological restrictions, a growing movement advocating a right to repair has emerged, despite pushback from some quarters. The right to repair is at the center of a key policy debate. The Biden Administration and a unanimous FTC recently voiced support for competition and consumer choice in repair markets. Legislation under consideration in dozens of states would facilitate consumer and third-party repair. And regulators around the world have begun to embrace the repair agenda. But manufacturers and device makers remain skeptical of an unfettered right to repair, citing concerns over intellectual property rights, reliability, security, and lost revenue. This symposium will consider the complex, overlapping set of policy questions at the center of the repair debate. How do restrictions on repair, or their elimination, affect competition? How might policymakers resolve potential tensions between the right to repair and the intellectual property rights of device makers? Would the consumer benefits of open repair markets outweigh their risks? And what legislative solutions or other policy interventions are best-suited to address these questions? Speakers Jennifer Sturiale, University of Maryland (moderator)Michael Carrier, Rutgers Law SchoolShubha Ghosh, Syracuse UniversityDaniel Hanley, Open Markets InstituteCarl Shapiro, UC Berkeley  

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 1/1/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
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26th Annual BCLT/BTLJ Symposium: The Emergent Right to Repair - Consumer Protection Issues

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

In years past, consumers didn’t think twice about taking a broken car or toaster to a local repair shop or even fixing it themselves. But with today’s software-enabled products, consumers can no longer take those options for granted. In response to legal and technological restrictions, a growing movement advocating a right to repair has emerged, despite pushback from some quarters. The right to repair is at the center of a key policy debate. The Biden Administration and a unanimous FTC recently voiced support for competition and consumer choice in repair markets. Legislation under consideration in dozens of states would facilitate consumer and third-party repair. And regulators around the world have begun to embrace the repair agenda. But manufacturers and device makers remain skeptical of an unfettered right to repair, citing concerns over intellectual property rights, reliability, security, and lost revenue. This symposium will consider the complex, overlapping set of policy questions at the center of the repair debate. How do restrictions on repair, or their elimination, affect competition? How might policymakers resolve potential tensions between the right to repair and the intellectual property rights of device makers? Would the consumer benefits of open repair markets outweigh their risks? And what legislative solutions or other policy interventions are best-suited to address these questions? Speakers Abbye Atkinson, Berkeley Law (moderator)Maureen Mahoney, Consumer ReportsAaron Perzanowski, Case Western ReserveDuane Pozza, Wiley ReinPaul Roberts, SecuRepairs  

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 1/1/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
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26th Annual BCLT/BTLJ Symposium: The Emergent Right to Repair - IP Issues

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

In years past, consumers didn’t think twice about taking a broken car or toaster to a local repair shop or even fixing it themselves. But with today’s software-enabled products, consumers can no longer take those options for granted. In response to legal and technological restrictions, a growing movement advocating a right to repair has emerged, despite pushback from some quarters. The right to repair is at the center of a key policy debate. The Biden Administration and a unanimous FTC recently voiced support for competition and consumer choice in repair markets. Legislation under consideration in dozens of states would facilitate consumer and third-party repair. And regulators around the world have begun to embrace the repair agenda. But manufacturers and device makers remain skeptical of an unfettered right to repair, citing concerns over intellectual property rights, reliability, security, and lost revenue. This symposium will consider the complex, overlapping set of policy questions at the center of the repair debate. How do restrictions on repair, or their elimination, affect competition? How might policymakers resolve potential tensions between the right to repair and the intellectual property rights of device makers? Would the consumer benefits of open repair markets outweigh their risks? And what legislative solutions or other policy interventions are best-suited to address these questions? Speakers     Pam Samuelson, Berkeley Law (moderator)Robert Gomulkiewicz, University of WashingtonLeah Grinvald, Suffolk UniversityJosh Sarnoff, DePaul UniversityKit Walsh, Electronic Frontier Foundation    

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 1/1/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
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26th Annual BCLT/BTLJ Symposium: The Emergent Right to Repair - Keynote, Kyle Wiens, iFixit

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

In years past, consumers didn’t think twice about taking a broken car or toaster to a local repair shop or even fixing it themselves. But with today’s software-enabled products, consumers can no longer take those options for granted. In response to legal and technological restrictions, a growing movement advocating a right to repair has emerged, despite pushback from some quarters. The right to repair is at the center of a key policy debate. The Biden Administration and a unanimous FTC recently voiced support for competition and consumer choice in repair markets. Legislation under consideration in dozens of states would facilitate consumer and third-party repair. And regulators around the world have begun to embrace the repair agenda. But manufacturers and device makers remain skeptical of an unfettered right to repair, citing concerns over intellectual property rights, reliability, security, and lost revenue. This symposium will consider the complex, overlapping set of policy questions at the center of the repair debate. How do restrictions on repair, or their elimination, affect competition? How might policymakers resolve potential tensions between the right to repair and the intellectual property rights of device makers? Would the consumer benefits of open repair markets outweigh their risks? And what legislative solutions or other policy interventions are best-suited to address these questions? Speaker Kyle Wiens, iFixit    

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 30
    Min.
  • 1/1/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
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26th Annual BCLT/BTLJ Symposium: The Emergent Right to Repair - Legislative Approaches

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

In years past, consumers didn’t think twice about taking a broken car or toaster to a local repair shop or even fixing it themselves. But with today’s software-enabled products, consumers can no longer take those options for granted. In response to legal and technological restrictions, a growing movement advocating a right to repair has emerged, despite pushback from some quarters. The right to repair is at the center of a key policy debate. The Biden Administration and a unanimous FTC recently voiced support for competition and consumer choice in repair markets. Legislation under consideration in dozens of states would facilitate consumer and third-party repair. And regulators around the world have begun to embrace the repair agenda. But manufacturers and device makers remain skeptical of an unfettered right to repair, citing concerns over intellectual property rights, reliability, security, and lost revenue. This symposium will consider the complex, overlapping set of policy questions at the center of the repair debate. How do restrictions on repair, or their elimination, affect competition? How might policymakers resolve potential tensions between the right to repair and the intellectual property rights of device makers? Would the consumer benefits of open repair markets outweigh their risks? And what legislative solutions or other policy interventions are best-suited to address these questions? Chris Hoofnagle, Berkeley Law  (moderator)Nathan Proctor, U.S. Public Interest Research GroupBlake Reid, University of Colorado Law SchoolKerry Sheehan, Independent policy consultantMatthew Williams, Mitchell Silberberg Knupp  

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 1/1/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
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26th Annual BCLT/BTLJ Symposium: The Emergent Right to Repair - Repair in International Contexts

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

In years past, consumers didn’t think twice about taking a broken car or toaster to a local repair shop or even fixing it themselves. But with today’s software-enabled products, consumers can no longer take those options for granted. In response to legal and technological restrictions, a growing movement advocating a right to repair has emerged, despite pushback from some quarters. The right to repair is at the center of a key policy debate. The Biden Administration and a unanimous FTC recently voiced support for competition and consumer choice in repair markets. Legislation under consideration in dozens of states would facilitate consumer and third-party repair. And regulators around the world have begun to embrace the repair agenda. But manufacturers and device makers remain skeptical of an unfettered right to repair, citing concerns over intellectual property rights, reliability, security, and lost revenue. This symposium will consider the complex, overlapping set of policy questions at the center of the repair debate. How do restrictions on repair, or their elimination, affect competition? How might policymakers resolve potential tensions between the right to repair and the intellectual property rights of device makers? Would the consumer benefits of open repair markets outweigh their risks? And what legislative solutions or other policy interventions are best-suited to address these questions? Speakers Aaron Perzanowski, Case Western Reserve (moderator)Estelle Derclaye, University of NottinghamJessika Richter, Lund UniversityMatthew Rimmer, Queensland University of TechnologyAnthony Rosboroug, European University Institute

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 1/1/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
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Berkeley IP Tech and Law Month: Music Copyright Litigation/Case Management Year In Review

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

As part of Berkeley IP Tech & Law month, our instructors take you through the key highlights from the last year in Berkeley IP Tech and Law Month: Music Copyright Litigation/Case Management Year In Review. Speakers Peter Anderson, Davis Wright TremaineMark Avsec, Benesch, Friedlander, Coplan & AronoffRobert Clarida, Reitler, Kailas & RosenblattPeter Menell, BCLT/Berkeley Law

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 1/1/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
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Berkeley IP Tech and Law Month: Telecommunications Law Year in Review

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

As part of Berkeley IP Tech & Law month, our instructors take you through the key highlights from the last year in Berkeley IP Tech and Law Month: Telecommunications Law Year in Review. Speakers: Ari Fitzgerald, Hogan LovellsStephanie Weiner, Harris WiltshireWayne Stacy, BCLT/Berkeley Law  

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 1/1/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
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Beyond Copyright Infringement: DSA Review, Moderation and Liability Rules Compared to Previous National Review and Takedown Approaches for Illegal Content

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

27th Annual BTLJ-BCLT Symposium: From the DMCA to the DSA Tutorial “The EU Digital Services Act – Overview and Central Features”   Speaker: Matthias Leistner, LMU Munich Faculty of Law 

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 40
    Min.
  • 10/7/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
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General DSA Architecture and Approach

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

27th Annual BTLJ-BCLT Symposium: From the DMCA to the DSA Tutorial “The EU Digital Services Act – Overview and Central Features”   Speaker: Martin Senftleben, University of Amsterdam

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 41
    Min.
  • 10/8/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
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Interplay with OCSSP Rules in the Directive on Copyright in the Digital Single Market

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

27th Annual BTLJ-BCLT Symposium: From the DMCA to the DSA Tutorial “The EU Digital Services Act – Overview and Central Features”   Speaker: João Quintais, University of Amsterdam

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 27
    Min.
  • 10/7/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
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Rules for Hosting Providers, Online Platforms and Very Large Online Platforms

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

27th Annual BTLJ-BCLT Symposium: From the DMCA to the DSA Tutorial “The EU Digital Services Act – Overview and Central Features”   Speaker: Martin Husovec, London School of Economics

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 35
    Min.
  • 10/7/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
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USPTO’s Battle Against Fraudulent Trademark Filings From China: Origins, Strategies, and Ethics

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

In recent years Chinese companies have become major filers of trademarks at the USPTO. The filings have likely been in response to market demands, the growth of e-commerce, and domestic Chinese subsidies. However, the increase has also brought with it numerous unscrupulous actors on both sides of the Pacific. The result has been a surge in fraudulent USPTO trademark filings and disciplinary actions brought by USPTO, as well as cancellation of thousands of trademark applications. The increase in USPTO disciplinary activity has also come at a time that China has been increasingly concerned about misuse of IP filing subsidies and the need to increase its own controls over bad faith filings in China. These developments in Chinese trademark filings at the USPTO may lso reflects the difficulties in establishing and enforcing cross-border disciplinary rules. Speaker: Mark Cohen, BCLT, Asia SocietyMichael Mangelson. USPTOJennifer Chicoski, USPTOHaiyan Ren, Wanhuida   NOTE: You will receive a certificate of completion for CLE credit after viewing this course on the B-CLE platform.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 90
    Min.
  • 4/20/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS