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26th Annual BCLT/BTLJ Symposium: The Emergent Right to Repair - Competition Issues

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

In years past, consumers didn’t think twice about taking a broken car or toaster to a local repair shop or even fixing it themselves. But with today’s software-enabled products, consumers can no longer take those options for granted. In response to legal and technological restrictions, a growing movement advocating a right to repair has emerged, despite pushback from some quarters. The right to repair is at the center of a key policy debate. The Biden Administration and a unanimous FTC recently voiced support for competition and consumer choice in repair markets. Legislation under consideration in dozens of states would facilitate consumer and third-party repair. And regulators around the world have begun to embrace the repair agenda. But manufacturers and device makers remain skeptical of an unfettered right to repair, citing concerns over intellectual property rights, reliability, security, and lost revenue. This symposium will consider the complex, overlapping set of policy questions at the center of the repair debate. How do restrictions on repair, or their elimination, affect competition? How might policymakers resolve potential tensions between the right to repair and the intellectual property rights of device makers? Would the consumer benefits of open repair markets outweigh their risks? And what legislative solutions or other policy interventions are best-suited to address these questions? Speakers Jennifer Sturiale, University of Maryland (moderator)Michael Carrier, Rutgers Law SchoolShubha Ghosh, Syracuse UniversityDaniel Hanley, Open Markets InstituteCarl Shapiro, UC Berkeley  

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26th Annual BCLT/BTLJ Symposium: The Emergent Right to Repair - Consumer Protection Issues

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

In years past, consumers didn’t think twice about taking a broken car or toaster to a local repair shop or even fixing it themselves. But with today’s software-enabled products, consumers can no longer take those options for granted. In response to legal and technological restrictions, a growing movement advocating a right to repair has emerged, despite pushback from some quarters. The right to repair is at the center of a key policy debate. The Biden Administration and a unanimous FTC recently voiced support for competition and consumer choice in repair markets. Legislation under consideration in dozens of states would facilitate consumer and third-party repair. And regulators around the world have begun to embrace the repair agenda. But manufacturers and device makers remain skeptical of an unfettered right to repair, citing concerns over intellectual property rights, reliability, security, and lost revenue. This symposium will consider the complex, overlapping set of policy questions at the center of the repair debate. How do restrictions on repair, or their elimination, affect competition? How might policymakers resolve potential tensions between the right to repair and the intellectual property rights of device makers? Would the consumer benefits of open repair markets outweigh their risks? And what legislative solutions or other policy interventions are best-suited to address these questions? Speakers Abbye Atkinson, Berkeley Law (moderator)Maureen Mahoney, Consumer ReportsAaron Perzanowski, Case Western ReserveDuane Pozza, Wiley ReinPaul Roberts, SecuRepairs  

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26th Annual BCLT/BTLJ Symposium: The Emergent Right to Repair - IP Issues

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

In years past, consumers didn’t think twice about taking a broken car or toaster to a local repair shop or even fixing it themselves. But with today’s software-enabled products, consumers can no longer take those options for granted. In response to legal and technological restrictions, a growing movement advocating a right to repair has emerged, despite pushback from some quarters. The right to repair is at the center of a key policy debate. The Biden Administration and a unanimous FTC recently voiced support for competition and consumer choice in repair markets. Legislation under consideration in dozens of states would facilitate consumer and third-party repair. And regulators around the world have begun to embrace the repair agenda. But manufacturers and device makers remain skeptical of an unfettered right to repair, citing concerns over intellectual property rights, reliability, security, and lost revenue. This symposium will consider the complex, overlapping set of policy questions at the center of the repair debate. How do restrictions on repair, or their elimination, affect competition? How might policymakers resolve potential tensions between the right to repair and the intellectual property rights of device makers? Would the consumer benefits of open repair markets outweigh their risks? And what legislative solutions or other policy interventions are best-suited to address these questions? Speakers     Pam Samuelson, Berkeley Law (moderator)Robert Gomulkiewicz, University of WashingtonLeah Grinvald, Suffolk UniversityJosh Sarnoff, DePaul UniversityKit Walsh, Electronic Frontier Foundation    

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26th Annual BCLT/BTLJ Symposium: The Emergent Right to Repair - Keynote, Kyle Wiens, iFixit

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

In years past, consumers didn’t think twice about taking a broken car or toaster to a local repair shop or even fixing it themselves. But with today’s software-enabled products, consumers can no longer take those options for granted. In response to legal and technological restrictions, a growing movement advocating a right to repair has emerged, despite pushback from some quarters. The right to repair is at the center of a key policy debate. The Biden Administration and a unanimous FTC recently voiced support for competition and consumer choice in repair markets. Legislation under consideration in dozens of states would facilitate consumer and third-party repair. And regulators around the world have begun to embrace the repair agenda. But manufacturers and device makers remain skeptical of an unfettered right to repair, citing concerns over intellectual property rights, reliability, security, and lost revenue. This symposium will consider the complex, overlapping set of policy questions at the center of the repair debate. How do restrictions on repair, or their elimination, affect competition? How might policymakers resolve potential tensions between the right to repair and the intellectual property rights of device makers? Would the consumer benefits of open repair markets outweigh their risks? And what legislative solutions or other policy interventions are best-suited to address these questions? Speaker Kyle Wiens, iFixit    

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26th Annual BCLT/BTLJ Symposium: The Emergent Right to Repair - Legislative Approaches

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

In years past, consumers didn’t think twice about taking a broken car or toaster to a local repair shop or even fixing it themselves. But with today’s software-enabled products, consumers can no longer take those options for granted. In response to legal and technological restrictions, a growing movement advocating a right to repair has emerged, despite pushback from some quarters. The right to repair is at the center of a key policy debate. The Biden Administration and a unanimous FTC recently voiced support for competition and consumer choice in repair markets. Legislation under consideration in dozens of states would facilitate consumer and third-party repair. And regulators around the world have begun to embrace the repair agenda. But manufacturers and device makers remain skeptical of an unfettered right to repair, citing concerns over intellectual property rights, reliability, security, and lost revenue. This symposium will consider the complex, overlapping set of policy questions at the center of the repair debate. How do restrictions on repair, or their elimination, affect competition? How might policymakers resolve potential tensions between the right to repair and the intellectual property rights of device makers? Would the consumer benefits of open repair markets outweigh their risks? And what legislative solutions or other policy interventions are best-suited to address these questions? Chris Hoofnagle, Berkeley Law  (moderator)Nathan Proctor, U.S. Public Interest Research GroupBlake Reid, University of Colorado Law SchoolKerry Sheehan, Independent policy consultantMatthew Williams, Mitchell Silberberg Knupp  

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26th Annual BCLT/BTLJ Symposium: The Emergent Right to Repair - Repair in International Contexts

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

In years past, consumers didn’t think twice about taking a broken car or toaster to a local repair shop or even fixing it themselves. But with today’s software-enabled products, consumers can no longer take those options for granted. In response to legal and technological restrictions, a growing movement advocating a right to repair has emerged, despite pushback from some quarters. The right to repair is at the center of a key policy debate. The Biden Administration and a unanimous FTC recently voiced support for competition and consumer choice in repair markets. Legislation under consideration in dozens of states would facilitate consumer and third-party repair. And regulators around the world have begun to embrace the repair agenda. But manufacturers and device makers remain skeptical of an unfettered right to repair, citing concerns over intellectual property rights, reliability, security, and lost revenue. This symposium will consider the complex, overlapping set of policy questions at the center of the repair debate. How do restrictions on repair, or their elimination, affect competition? How might policymakers resolve potential tensions between the right to repair and the intellectual property rights of device makers? Would the consumer benefits of open repair markets outweigh their risks? And what legislative solutions or other policy interventions are best-suited to address these questions? Speakers Aaron Perzanowski, Case Western Reserve (moderator)Estelle Derclaye, University of NottinghamJessika Richter, Lund UniversityMatthew Rimmer, Queensland University of TechnologyAnthony Rosboroug, European University Institute

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Berkeley IP Tech and Law Month: Copyright Law Year in Review

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

Broad, meandering CLE programming can be a waste of time – a waste that most busy practitioners cannot afford. Practitioners need to focus on the precise legal issues that matter to their special practice. To get that knowledge to you, Berkeley Law and the Berkeley Center for Law & Technology (BCLT) have created Berkeley IP & Tech Month with over 30 highly-focused, year-in-review webinars. In these sessions, you can hear experts — many of whom are Berkeley Law instructors — explain the key cases from the prior year and their relevance. Pick the handful of sessions that matter to you and attend virtually. These are not your typical CLE courses. They are highly-focused sessions that are curated through Berkeley Law. Our instructors and faculty are the cornerstone of this program and, with over 60 tech and IP-focused instructors, that’s a lot of expertise. Speakers: Molly Van Houweling, BCLT/Berkeley LawAndy Gass, Latham & WatkinsPamela Samuelson, BCLT/Berkeley Law

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Berkeley IP Tech and Law Month: Life Sciences Year in Review

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

As part of Berkeley IP Tech & Law month, our instructors take you through the key highlights from the last year in Berkeley IP Tech and Law Month: Life Sciences Year in Review. Speakers:  Priyata Patel, Weil Gotshal Elizabeth Weiswasser, Weil GotshalAllison Schmitt, BCLT/Berkeley Law

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Berkeley IP Tech and Law Month: Music Copyright Litigation/Case Management Year In Review

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

As part of Berkeley IP Tech & Law month, our instructors take you through the key highlights from the last year in Berkeley IP Tech and Law Month: Music Copyright Litigation/Case Management Year In Review. Speakers Peter Anderson, Davis Wright TremaineMark Avsec, Benesch, Friedlander, Coplan & AronoffRobert Clarida, Reitler, Kailas & RosenblattPeter Menell, BCLT/Berkeley Law

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Berkeley IP Tech and Law Month: Telecommunications Law Year in Review

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

As part of Berkeley IP Tech & Law month, our instructors take you through the key highlights from the last year in Berkeley IP Tech and Law Month: Telecommunications Law Year in Review. Speakers: Ari Fitzgerald, Hogan LovellsStephanie Weiner, Harris WiltshireWayne Stacy, BCLT/Berkeley Law