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26th Annual BCLT/BTLJ Symposium: The Emergent Right to Repair - Competition Issues

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

In years past, consumers didn’t think twice about taking a broken car or toaster to a local repair shop or even fixing it themselves. But with today’s software-enabled products, consumers can no longer take those options for granted. In response to legal and technological restrictions, a growing movement advocating a right to repair has emerged, despite pushback from some quarters. The right to repair is at the center of a key policy debate. The Biden Administration and a unanimous FTC recently voiced support for competition and consumer choice in repair markets. Legislation under consideration in dozens of states would facilitate consumer and third-party repair. And regulators around the world have begun to embrace the repair agenda. But manufacturers and device makers remain skeptical of an unfettered right to repair, citing concerns over intellectual property rights, reliability, security, and lost revenue. This symposium will consider the complex, overlapping set of policy questions at the center of the repair debate. How do restrictions on repair, or their elimination, affect competition? How might policymakers resolve potential tensions between the right to repair and the intellectual property rights of device makers? Would the consumer benefits of open repair markets outweigh their risks? And what legislative solutions or other policy interventions are best-suited to address these questions? Speakers Jennifer Sturiale, University of Maryland (moderator)Michael Carrier, Rutgers Law SchoolShubha Ghosh, Syracuse UniversityDaniel Hanley, Open Markets InstituteCarl Shapiro, UC Berkeley  

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 1/1/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
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26th Annual BCLT/BTLJ Symposium: The Emergent Right to Repair - Consumer Protection Issues

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

In years past, consumers didn’t think twice about taking a broken car or toaster to a local repair shop or even fixing it themselves. But with today’s software-enabled products, consumers can no longer take those options for granted. In response to legal and technological restrictions, a growing movement advocating a right to repair has emerged, despite pushback from some quarters. The right to repair is at the center of a key policy debate. The Biden Administration and a unanimous FTC recently voiced support for competition and consumer choice in repair markets. Legislation under consideration in dozens of states would facilitate consumer and third-party repair. And regulators around the world have begun to embrace the repair agenda. But manufacturers and device makers remain skeptical of an unfettered right to repair, citing concerns over intellectual property rights, reliability, security, and lost revenue. This symposium will consider the complex, overlapping set of policy questions at the center of the repair debate. How do restrictions on repair, or their elimination, affect competition? How might policymakers resolve potential tensions between the right to repair and the intellectual property rights of device makers? Would the consumer benefits of open repair markets outweigh their risks? And what legislative solutions or other policy interventions are best-suited to address these questions? Speakers Abbye Atkinson, Berkeley Law (moderator)Maureen Mahoney, Consumer ReportsAaron Perzanowski, Case Western ReserveDuane Pozza, Wiley ReinPaul Roberts, SecuRepairs  

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 1/1/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
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26th Annual BCLT/BTLJ Symposium: The Emergent Right to Repair - IP Issues

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

In years past, consumers didn’t think twice about taking a broken car or toaster to a local repair shop or even fixing it themselves. But with today’s software-enabled products, consumers can no longer take those options for granted. In response to legal and technological restrictions, a growing movement advocating a right to repair has emerged, despite pushback from some quarters. The right to repair is at the center of a key policy debate. The Biden Administration and a unanimous FTC recently voiced support for competition and consumer choice in repair markets. Legislation under consideration in dozens of states would facilitate consumer and third-party repair. And regulators around the world have begun to embrace the repair agenda. But manufacturers and device makers remain skeptical of an unfettered right to repair, citing concerns over intellectual property rights, reliability, security, and lost revenue. This symposium will consider the complex, overlapping set of policy questions at the center of the repair debate. How do restrictions on repair, or their elimination, affect competition? How might policymakers resolve potential tensions between the right to repair and the intellectual property rights of device makers? Would the consumer benefits of open repair markets outweigh their risks? And what legislative solutions or other policy interventions are best-suited to address these questions? Speakers     Pam Samuelson, Berkeley Law (moderator)Robert Gomulkiewicz, University of WashingtonLeah Grinvald, Suffolk UniversityJosh Sarnoff, DePaul UniversityKit Walsh, Electronic Frontier Foundation    

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 1/1/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

26th Annual BCLT/BTLJ Symposium: The Emergent Right to Repair - Keynote, Kyle Wiens, iFixit

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

In years past, consumers didn’t think twice about taking a broken car or toaster to a local repair shop or even fixing it themselves. But with today’s software-enabled products, consumers can no longer take those options for granted. In response to legal and technological restrictions, a growing movement advocating a right to repair has emerged, despite pushback from some quarters. The right to repair is at the center of a key policy debate. The Biden Administration and a unanimous FTC recently voiced support for competition and consumer choice in repair markets. Legislation under consideration in dozens of states would facilitate consumer and third-party repair. And regulators around the world have begun to embrace the repair agenda. But manufacturers and device makers remain skeptical of an unfettered right to repair, citing concerns over intellectual property rights, reliability, security, and lost revenue. This symposium will consider the complex, overlapping set of policy questions at the center of the repair debate. How do restrictions on repair, or their elimination, affect competition? How might policymakers resolve potential tensions between the right to repair and the intellectual property rights of device makers? Would the consumer benefits of open repair markets outweigh their risks? And what legislative solutions or other policy interventions are best-suited to address these questions? Speaker Kyle Wiens, iFixit    

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 30
    Min.
  • 1/1/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
Course1

26th Annual BCLT/BTLJ Symposium: The Emergent Right to Repair - Legislative Approaches

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

In years past, consumers didn’t think twice about taking a broken car or toaster to a local repair shop or even fixing it themselves. But with today’s software-enabled products, consumers can no longer take those options for granted. In response to legal and technological restrictions, a growing movement advocating a right to repair has emerged, despite pushback from some quarters. The right to repair is at the center of a key policy debate. The Biden Administration and a unanimous FTC recently voiced support for competition and consumer choice in repair markets. Legislation under consideration in dozens of states would facilitate consumer and third-party repair. And regulators around the world have begun to embrace the repair agenda. But manufacturers and device makers remain skeptical of an unfettered right to repair, citing concerns over intellectual property rights, reliability, security, and lost revenue. This symposium will consider the complex, overlapping set of policy questions at the center of the repair debate. How do restrictions on repair, or their elimination, affect competition? How might policymakers resolve potential tensions between the right to repair and the intellectual property rights of device makers? Would the consumer benefits of open repair markets outweigh their risks? And what legislative solutions or other policy interventions are best-suited to address these questions? Chris Hoofnagle, Berkeley Law  (moderator)Nathan Proctor, U.S. Public Interest Research GroupBlake Reid, University of Colorado Law SchoolKerry Sheehan, Independent policy consultantMatthew Williams, Mitchell Silberberg Knupp  

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 1/1/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
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26th Annual BCLT/BTLJ Symposium: The Emergent Right to Repair - Repair in International Contexts

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

In years past, consumers didn’t think twice about taking a broken car or toaster to a local repair shop or even fixing it themselves. But with today’s software-enabled products, consumers can no longer take those options for granted. In response to legal and technological restrictions, a growing movement advocating a right to repair has emerged, despite pushback from some quarters. The right to repair is at the center of a key policy debate. The Biden Administration and a unanimous FTC recently voiced support for competition and consumer choice in repair markets. Legislation under consideration in dozens of states would facilitate consumer and third-party repair. And regulators around the world have begun to embrace the repair agenda. But manufacturers and device makers remain skeptical of an unfettered right to repair, citing concerns over intellectual property rights, reliability, security, and lost revenue. This symposium will consider the complex, overlapping set of policy questions at the center of the repair debate. How do restrictions on repair, or their elimination, affect competition? How might policymakers resolve potential tensions between the right to repair and the intellectual property rights of device makers? Would the consumer benefits of open repair markets outweigh their risks? And what legislative solutions or other policy interventions are best-suited to address these questions? Speakers Aaron Perzanowski, Case Western Reserve (moderator)Estelle Derclaye, University of NottinghamJessika Richter, Lund UniversityMatthew Rimmer, Queensland University of TechnologyAnthony Rosboroug, European University Institute

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 60
    Min.
  • 1/1/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
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AI as an Inventing Tool: AI as a tool to promote fair access to the patent system (Panel4/Closing)

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

AI as an Inventing Tool—Its Implicatioins for Patent Law and PolicyRecorded November 15, 2023 Event Information | Agenda | Resources   Participate in Professor Colleen Chien's Study!   Speakers Prof. Colleen ChienBCLT, Berkeley Law   Prof. Keith RobinsonWake Forest University School of Law

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 38
    Min.
  • 6/3/25
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
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AI as an Inventing Tool: AI’s challenges to Patent law – Inventorship (Panel 2)

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

AI as an Inventing Tool—Its Implicatioins for Patent Law and PolicyRecorded November 15, 2023 Event Information | Agenda | Resources   Participate in Professor Colleen Chien's Study!   Speakers Prof. Dennis CrouchUniversity of Missouri School of Law Yuan Hao, PhDBCLT, Berkeley Law Nalini MummalaneniUSPTO Moderator Prof. Robert MergesBCLT, Berkeley Law

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 59
    Min.
  • 6/3/26
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
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AI as an Inventing Tool: Beyond Inventorship (Panel 3)

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

AI as an Inventing Tool—Its Implicatioins for Patent Law and PolicyRecorded November 15, 2023 Event Information | Agenda | Resources   Participate in Professor Colleen Chien's Study!   Speakers Ali AlemozafarPartner, Wilson Sonsini Yuan Hao, PhDBCLT, Berkeley Law Prof. Peter LeeUC Davis Law Prof. Robert MergesBCLT, Berkeley Law Moderator Prof. Colleen ChienBCLT, Berkeley Law

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 51
    Min.
  • 6/3/25
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
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AI as an Inventing Tool: Using AI as an inventing tool – the technological basis (Panel 1)

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

AI as an Inventing Tool—Its Implicatioins for Patent Law and PolicyRecorded November 15, 2023 Event Information | Agenda | Resources   Participate in Professor Colleen Chien's Study!   Speakers Calvin ChinFounding Partner, E14 ventures Ali Madani, PhDCEO, Profluent Moderator Yuan Hao, PhDBCLT, Berkeley Law

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 50
    Min.
  • 6/3/25
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
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Biotechnology & Inventorship – What You Need To Know | Trade Secrets and Inventorship: Disputes and Best Practices (Part 2)

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

Part 2: Trade Secrets and Inventorship: Disputes and Best Practices In part two, Trade Secrets and Inventorship: Disputes and Best Practices, join BCLT Life Sciences Director Allison Schmitt in conversation with Brent Sokol, an experienced biotech litigator, and Greg Bombard, a widely-recognized trade secret trial lawyer provide an overview of trade secret law. We recommend best practices for trade secret protection, and explore inventorship issues as they arise in the context of trade secret disputes.

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 75
    Min.
  • 4/4/25
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS
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Protecting IP with Overseas Partners: Lessons from smart oven trade secret litigation

  • Author/Instructor:  BCLT

Manufacturing through overseas partners may be a necessity, albeit one that comes fraught with risk of IP theft.  Come learn practical tips for how to minimize the risk of such misappropriation, as well as best practices for responding when bad acts occur, as taught through lessons learned in a recent litigation. Speakers: Steven C. Carson, Robins KaplanKevin M. Pasquinelli, Robins Kaplan

  • On-Demand
    Format
  • 30
    Min.
  • 5/5/24
    Avail. to
  • DETAILS