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Academics and Social Media: The revolution will not be televised

  • Author/Instructor:  BJI

Seeking ways to have your academic work connect to more people? Our conversation will celebrate Credit Slips, a blog on all things about credit, bankruptcy, consumers and financial institutions as a springboard for discussion. There, academics discuss and debate issues for those who care about creating good policies in these areas. (They tweet @CreditSlips.) Their work has been profiled by national and local media. We’ll use that experience for a broader discussion about how academics can use social media to have their voices heard. Bankruptcy Judge Erithe Smith will interview blog administrator and contributor Professor Bob Lawless and contributor Professor Pamela Foohey. This course does not offer CLE credit.    

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Are Courthouses Male or Female? Designing for Inclusion: How Courthouse Design Affects Community Confidence (...)

  • Author/Instructor:  BJI

Are Courthouses Male or Female? Designing for Inclusion: How Courthouse Design Affects Community Confidence in the Delivery of JusticeU.S. Magistrate Judge Celeste F. Bremer (IASD, Recall) and California architect Susan Oldroyd  FAIA, will show how types of Courthouse interior and exterior designs and their art influence our understanding of the Court’s role in the community. They will identify features that you may no longer notice, but that represent barriers to the delivery of Equal Justice For All. Do Courthouses read as Male or Female? How do implicit biases affect our impressions of whether a Courthouse provides safety, transparency, accessibility, reconciliation, or retribution? What messages about inclusion does your Courthouse design send to public and staff? The style, material, and layout of Courthouses signal that are they fortresses or welcoming spaces. Courthouses have been targets of recent social unrest. Can Courthouses provide communities with space for understanding how Justice is done, while engaging in civil discourse about change? Courthouses represent community values such as stability and consistency; they are places of retribution and rehabilitation. Courthouse design should show society’s values of fairness and transparency, and allow for participation by all.  How we design, construct, and operate Courthouses sends a message to our communities about our values. Through Courthouse design and operation, can we be more intentional about the importance of the Rule of Law, and how the justice system operates? This course does not offer CLE credit.    

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Berkeley Law Alumni Reunion – Best Practices in Court Administration: What We’ve Learned from COVID-19

  • Author/Instructor:  BJI

Courts, lawyers and judges are accustomed to moving deliberately. The pandemic has challenged courts to do things in ways that are unfamiliar and the effects of which often are uncertain. Judge Jeremy Fogel will moderate a discussion about those challenges with leading alumni judges of both state and federal courts. This course does not offer CLE credit.  

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Berkeley Law and the Judiciary (Day 1) - How Law Schools Make a Difference

  • Author/Instructor:  BJI

Berkeley Judicial Institute will offer a virtual program for judges featuring some of the many bright lights of the Berkeley faculty. Program sessions will include: – Bias in the courts– Criminal law– Decision-making– Intellectual property law– Mindfulness This course does not offer CLE credit.  

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Berkeley Law and the Judiciary (Day 1) - Mindfulness Practices

  • Author/Instructor:  BJI

Berkeley Judicial Institute will offer a virtual program for judges featuring some of the many bright lights of the Berkeley faculty. Program sessions will include: – Bias in the courts – Criminal law – Decision-making – Intellectual property law – Mindfulness This course does not offer CLE credit.  

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Berkeley Law and the Judiciary (Day 2) - How Opinionated Should Opinions Be?

  • Author/Instructor:  BJI

Berkeley Judicial Institute will offer a virtual program for judges featuring some of the many bright lights of the Berkeley faculty. Program sessions will include: – Bias in the courts – Criminal law – Decision-making – Intellectual property law – Mindfulness This course does not offer CLE credit.  

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Berkeley Law and the Judiciary (Day 2) - Recent Music Copyright Infringement Cases: Greatest Hits

  • Author/Instructor:  BJI

Berkeley Judicial Institute will offer a virtual program for judges featuring some of the many bright lights of the Berkeley faculty. Program sessions will include: – Bias in the courts – Criminal law – Decision-making – Intellectual property law – Mindfulness This course does not offer CLE credit.

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Berkeley Law and the Judiciary (Day 2) - The State of Forensic Evidence in 2022

  • Author/Instructor:  BJI

Berkeley Judicial Institute will offer a virtual program for judges featuring some of the many bright lights of the Berkeley faculty. Program sessions will include: – Bias in the courts – Criminal law – Decision-making – Intellectual property law – Mindfulness This course does not offer CLE credit.  

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Berkeley Law and the Judiciary (Day 3) - The Impact of Serving as a Law Clerk

  • Author/Instructor:  BJI

Berkeley Judicial Institute will offer a virtual program for judges featuring some of the many bright lights of the Berkeley faculty. Program sessions will include: – Bias in the courts – Criminal law – Decision-making – Intellectual property law – Mindfulness This course does not offer CLE credit.    

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Berkeley Law and the Judiciary (Day 3) - What does this mean for us: group discussion on challenges facing the judiciary

  • Author/Instructor:  BJI

Berkeley Judicial Institute will offer a virtual program for judges featuring some of the many bright lights of the Berkeley faculty. Program sessions will include: – Bias in the courts – Criminal law – Decision-making – Intellectual property law – Mindfulness This course does not offer CLE credit.  

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Best Practices in Court Administration: What We’ve Learned from COVID

  • Author/Instructor:  BJI

Courts, lawyers and judges move deliberately. The pandemic has challenged courts to do things in ways that are uncomfortable. Judge Jeremy Fogel, BJI Executive Director, will moderate a discussion about those challenges with key court players. Participants are IAALS Executive Director Justice Scott Bales and U.S. District Court Judge Julie Robinson.   This course does not offer CLE credit.  

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Best Practices in Judicial Administration: What We’ve Learned During COVID

  • Author/Instructor:  BJI

Good realized during a crisis would be awful to waste. Judge Jeremy Fogel, BJI Executive Director, will moderate a discussion of some of the positive impact for the courts during the pandemic, with some key players creating that positive impact. Participants are Michigan Chief Justice Bridget Mary McCormack and Professor Caitlin Moon. This course does not offer CLE credit. 

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Coaching Judges

  • Author/Instructor:  BJI

Good judges strive to be lifetime learners; what part does coaching play in that growth?Join Berkeley Judicial Institute, Senior Judge Kevin Burke and Chief Judge Mildred Cabán as we consider some of the formal and informal methods of judicial coaching. Both judges have been active in coaching colleagues through the formal processes of judicial orientation and continuing education. Judge Burke has helped judges seeking improvement on issues ranging from better listening to demeanor on the bench one on one. This course does not offer CLE credit.  

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Contemporary Lessons on Judging and Justice from the Holocaust

  • Author/Instructor:  BJI

Join us for a program exploring the role of judges and the courts during the Holocaust and the relevance that experience has for judges today. Judges were among those inside Germany who might have effectively challenged Hitler’s authority, the legitimacy of the Nazi regime, the hundreds of laws that restricted political freedoms and civil rights, and the guarantees of property and security. And yet the overwhelming majority did not. What lessons does that experience provide for judges and courts today? Open to all, and of particular interest to judges, the program will consider: key historical context and lessons current relevance for judges BJI Executive Director Judge Jeremy Fogel will be joined by Dr. Will Meinecke of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum to discuss the history of the judiciary during the Holocaust; Judge Fogel and United States District Judge Rya Zobel will discuss the relevance of that history for judges today. This course does not offer CLE credit.  

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Expanding Library Services to People in Jails and Prisons

  • Author/Instructor:  BJI

In January 2022, the San Francisco Public Library and the American Library Association received a $2 million grant from the Andrew Mellon Foundation.The grant is aimed at improving and expanding library services for incarcerated citizens both locally and nationally.Join Berkeley Judicial Institute as we speak to representatives of SFPL’s Jail and Reentry Team Jeanie Austin and Rachel Kinnon and VCU Professor Blythe Balestrieri to find out more about the library’s ambitious plans for this grant. Judge Alexandra Robert Gordon will moderate the conversation, which will include these questions: What are the most important challenges they face? How will this work help better meet needs of incarcerated people? How can judges and the interested public find out more about these efforts? This course does not offer CLE credit.  

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Her Honor: My Life on the Bench…What Works, What’s Broken, and How to Change It

  • Author/Instructor:  BJI

Berkeley Judicial Institute Executive Director Judge Jeremy Fogel, in tandem with Judge Thelton Henderson, interview Judge LaDoris Hazzard Cordell. The event will be in person at the Berkeley Law School, and is open to all Berkeley Law students.   The former state judicial colleagues will talk about ALL of the issues in the title of Judge Cordell’s book; audience questions welcome. We anticipate a lively discussion! Judge Cordell’s book, HER HONOR, will be published in October. Early program registrants will receive a copy of the book, and will get so much more value from the discussion by reading the book prior to the program. Thinking about service in the judiciary as part of your legal career? Interested in the court’s role in solving the pressing problems of our day? This is a program you won’t want to miss. The publisher’s description: In Her Honor, Judge LaDoris Hazzard Cordell provides a rare and thought-provoking insider account of our legal system, sharing vivid stories of the cases that came through her courtroom and revealing the strengths, flaws, and much-needed changes within our courts. Judge Cordell, the first African American woman to sit on the Superior Court of Northern California, knows firsthand how prejudice has permeated our legal system. And yet, she believes in the system. From ending school segregation to legalizing same-sex marriage, its progress relies on legal professionals and jurors who strive to make the imperfect system as fair as possible. Her Honor is an entertaining and provocative look into the hearts and minds of judges. Cordell takes you into her chambers where she haggles with prosecutors and defense attorneys and into the courtroom during jury selection and sentencing hearings. She uses real cases to highlight how judges make difficult decisions, all the while facing outside pressures from the media, law enforcement, lobbyists, and the friends and families of the people involved. Cordell’s candid account of her years on the bench shines light on all areas of the legal system, from juvenile delinquency and the shift from rehabilitation to punishment, along with the racial biases therein, to the thousands of plea bargains that allow our overburdened courts to stay afloat—as long as innocent people are willing to plead guilty. There are tales of marriages and divorces, adoptions, and contested wills—some humorous, others heartwarming, still others deeply troubling. Her Honor is for anyone who’s had the good or bad fortune to stand before a judge or sit on a jury. It is for true-crime junkies and people who vote in judicial elections. Most importantly, this is a book for anyone who wants to know what our legal system, for better or worse, means to the everyday lives of all Americans. This course does not offer CLE credit.    

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Interactivity Tips for the “Occasional” Teacher

  • Author/Instructor:  BJI

2020 saw teachers of all stripes (some who professed being novices to technology) rise to the challenge of online learning. They met the demands of an extraordinary time, as did their students. And they did so much more—virtual office hours where no business could be discussed, online games, parties, graduations. That online expertise can be daunting for those who teach online only occasionally, so BJI collected some resources and tips for those “occasional teachers” who seek to make their online presentations more interactive. Want more? Join Berkeley Judicial Institute’s Director of Judicial Education Denise Neary and SMU Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professor and Richard R. Lee Endowed Professor of Law Beth Thornburg as they consider some tips and techniques (break-out rooms, chat, games, polls) the “occasional” teacher can borrow to make online teaching more engaging and fun. Review BJI’s interactivity tips and tricks document here! This course does not offer CLE credit.

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Judges, Technology and Artificial Intelligence

  • Author/Instructor:  BJI

University of Newcastle (Australia) Dean Tania Sourdin’s new book, Judges, Technology and Artificial Intelligence, is described: “New and emerging technologies are reshaping justice systems and transforming the role of judges. The impacts vary according to how structural reforms take place and how courts adapt case management processes, online dispute resolution systems and justice apps. Significant shifts are also occurring with the development of more sophisticated forms of Artificial Intelligence that can support judicial work or even replace judges. These developments, together with shifts towards online court processes are explored in Judges, Technology and Artificial Intelligence.” Dean Sourdin will introduce her research, discuss that work with Berkeley Center for Law and Technology’s Peter Menell and engage with the audience on these key issues for justice. This course does not offer CLE credit.    

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Judicial Evaluation: Seeking honest feedback

  • Author/Instructor:  BJI

How do judges seeking evaluation get honest feedback? Join Berkeley Judicial Institute for a discussion of ideas and techniques judges seeking feedback might consider. —U.S. Bankruptcy Judge William J. Lafferty III (ND/CA)—MN District Court Judge Kevin Burke (retired)—CA Associate Justice Carin T. Fujisaki—Federal Judicial Center Director of Research Beth Wiggins Your ideas, concerns and questions are welcome! This course does not offer CLE credit.  

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Judicial Stress and Resiliency: 2021 Pandemic Holiday Edition

  • Author/Instructor:  BJI

Is judging during the pandemic different from what you expected when you became a judge? Do you seek stronger connections with your work and with your colleagues?  Have the recent setbacks in many reopening plans been a new source of disappointment and stress? It’s worth reflecting on these issues as we approach a new year, particularly since the winter holidays typically are a challenging time for many of us. In 2020 and 2021, the Berkeley Judicial Institute offered four webinars on judicial temperament. These programs offered perspective that we hope will be helpful to judges at any time. The ongoing stresses of the pandemic encourage us to offer (at least) one more. In this program we will focus on these ongoing stresses and how judges are coping—and can cope—with them, regardless of the temperamental traits you bring to the bench. Join Judge Jeremy Fogel, BJI’s Executive Director, and Professor Terry Maroney as they devote a full program to answering questions submitted by you and that they’ve encountered in their many recent conversations with judges about the impact of the pandemic on judicial stress and resilience.   This course does not offer CLE credit.    

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Judicial Temperament (Part 1)

  • Author/Instructor:  BJI

“Sober as a judge” is a trope for good reason, but there has been little serious study about the elements of judicial temperament. Most people who have spent time in court can think of both positive and negative examples of judicial behavior, but developing a psychological framework for understanding that behavior is surprisingly difficult.  As virtual proceedings provide more transparency, judges are on public view to a greater extent than ever before.  What should viewers be looking for? Judge Jeremy Fogel, BJI Executive Director, and Professor Terry Maroney will discuss Professor Maroney’s cutting edge research on this topic. Access Professor Maroney’s Article: (What We Talk About When We Talk About) Judicial Temperament This course does not offer CLE credit.  

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Judicial Temperament Part 3: Emotional Regulation and Judicial Behavior

  • Author/Instructor:  BJI

How do parties, lawyers and the public hope that judges will behave in court? How can judges sharpen their understanding of their emotional responses to their often difficult jobs and regulate those responses in a way that supports an appropriate judicial demeanor? Join Judge Jeremy Fogel, BJI’s Executive Director, and Professor Terry Maroney as they discuss Professor Maroney’s work and consider how her study and observation can help judges in the courtroom. This course does not offer CLE credit.  

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Judicial Temperament Questions (and Answers)

  • Author/Instructor:  BJI

In 2020, BJI offered three programs on judicial temperament. July 15September 9December 2 Some common audience questions during the programs were: How do I recognize my temperamental traits as a judge? What is my temperamental “envelope of possibility” for change, and how can I make the most of it? How can I use this knowledge to change the temperature of an interaction in court? What techniques for regulating emotion do judicial colleagues find particularly effective? Join Judge Jeremy Fogel, BJI’s Executive Director, and Professor Terry Maroney as they devote an entire program to YOUR questions about judicial temperament. Submit your questions in advance here, bji@law.berkeley.edu, or ask them during the program. This course does not offer CLE credit.  

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Mass Tort Litigation Management in Bankruptcy Court

  • Author/Instructor:  BJI

Nearly four decades have passed since the birth of a radical experiment in procedural collectivism: using chapter 11 bankruptcy to manage mass tort litigation, starting with Johns Manville (asbestos) and A.H. Robins (Dalkon Shield IUD). Today, lawyers in mass tort bankruptcies routinely assert that bankruptcy is the only forum that offers complete resolution and global peace. Could it really be that the bankruptcy system is the right home for these disputes? Is there something inherent in the bankruptcy system that has caused, or at least facilitated, this apparent expansion?  What are the institutional limitations on any type of court to tackle the problems these cases raise?  Bankruptcy Judge William J. Lafferty, District Judge Frank W. Volk and Professor Melissa Jacoby discuss why so many controversial mass tort cases find their way to bankruptcy court, and consider how the courts might respond. This course does not offer CLE credit.    

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Promoting Judicial Collegiality

  • Author/Instructor:  BJI

Join Berkeley Judicial Institute for a discussion of best practices that promote judicial collegiality. U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Bernice Donald and MN district court Judge Kevin Burke (retired) will facilitate the conversation. Just participating is a step toward greater collegiality! This course does not offer CLE credit.  

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Rurality and Judging: A brown bag discussion with Dr. Michele Statz

  • Author/Instructor:  BJI

Dr. Statz’s new article, “On Shared Suffering: Judicial Intimacy in the Rural Northland,” explores the ways in which rurality impacts tribal and state court judges’ experiences on and beyond the bench. Beautifully written, it is of interest to those in every court environment. Law & Society Review says: “Drawing from four years of ethnographic fieldwork, Professor Statz’s study places its readers inside the “Northland” courtrooms of rural Wisconsin and Minnesota. Her research displays the intimate relationship that judges from these communities share with their litigants and demonstrates the hardships endured by both judges and their litigants due to the consequences of rural “legal deserts,” absent health and social services, and depressed local economies.” This course does not offer CLE credit.    

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Staying Well and Managing Stress in Difficult Times

  • Author/Instructor:  BJI

With Dr. Dacher Keltner and Judge Jeremy Fogel. Special thanks to Administrative Presiding Justice of the Sixth District Court of Appeal— Justice Mary Greenwood. Wellness resources:Greater Good In Action —discover new practicesAWE walkBasic Body Scan with Tara BrachMindfulness and Judging Resources for JudgesNovember happiness calendar This course does not offer CLE credit.  

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Systemic Inequality and the Courts – Part One

  • Author/Instructor:  BJI

It is a judge’s role to be fair and impartial, to decide only the issues and facts brought to court. Judges are also devoted citizens. Can judges be part of the conversation on systemic inequality? Join us for a discussion of the judge’s role in that conversation, featuring Berkeley Judicial Institute’s Executive Director Judge Jeremy Fogel, Second Circuit Judge Raymond Lohier and Professor Avani Mehta Sood. Open to all, including law students, this program aims to provide a better understanding of· how courts operate and· how key issues arise in court The program will be of particular interest to those contemplating applying for law clerk positions. This course does not offer CLE credit.  

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Systemic Inequality and the Courts – Part Two

  • Author/Instructor:  BJI

BJI’s program will consider the framework and theoretical issues of how judges are involved in the conversation on systemic inequality; join us Monday, November 16, for a follow up session considering the practical implications of that discussion for judges and the courts. Berkeley Judicial Institute Executive Director Judge Jeremy Fogel will be joined by California Supreme Court Associate Justice Goodwin Liu and Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Holly Thomas. Open to all, including law students, this program aims to provide better understanding of· how courts operate and· how key issues arise in court The program will be of particular interest to those contemplating applying for law clerk positions. This course does not offer CLE credit.

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The Elements of Judicial Temperament (Part Two)

  • Author/Instructor:  BJI

BJI’s July 15 presentation on judicial temperament introduced Professor Terry Maroney’s groundbreaking analysis of the elements of judicial temperament, the constellation of psychological traits that predict how judges will respond to the challenges of their work. Professor Maroney explained that while a person’s temperament is largely stable by adulthood, every judge has an “envelope of possibility” in which they can adapt their temperament to the professional requirements and public expectations of judges. At the conclusion of the presentation, many judges in the audience suggested a follow up program to examine the ways in which judges may understand their own temperamental traits and use that understanding to improve their judicial performance. This is that follow-up program. Once again, Judge Jeremy Fogel, BJI’s Executive Director, and Professor Terry Maroney will discuss Professor Maroney’s cutting edge research. (We strongly encourage you to watch the first program before participating in the second.) This course does not offer CLE credit.    

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Thinking of Law School?

  • Author/Instructor:  BJI

If you are thinking about law school and wondering what to expect, here are some considerations. CLE credit is not offered for this course.