BTLJ-CMTL-BCLT Symposium | Race & Technology Law: Innovating Health Equity

course

PROGRAM INFO

  • Available Until 1/1/2024
  • Class Time 1:00 PM ET
  • Duration 60 min.
  • Program Code 008
  • CA General CLE Credits: 2.00 hr(s)



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DESCRIPTION

The nexus of technology and the law has played a major role in amplifying racial injustices in many of society’s institutions. The global COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated pre-existing racial disparities in medicine, shedding light on the ways in which technology and the law impact equitable access to healthcare. But technology and the law can also be instruments for structural change. As future lawyers, the student leaders of the Berkeley Technology Law Journal (BTLJ) and the Coalition of Minorities in Tech Law (CMTL) are eager to examine race, health equity, and the effects of technological innovation on communities of color. Therefore, we are convening this special symposium with the Berkeley Center for Law and Technology (BCLT). Last fall, the first annual BTLJ-BCLT Race & Technology Law Symposium broached a variety of tech law topics as they intersect with race. This year, the Symposium focuses on how race, technology, and the law intersect in the healthcare space. We have invited leading and rising legal academics to share their research and perspectives on the intersection of technology, law, and race within the American healthcare system. In conversation with one another, they will help us explore and propose options for anti-racist paths forward for the fields of technology law and healthcare. We have entitled this symposium: “Race & Technology Law: Innovating Health Equity.” Our panels will highlight a variety of tech law topics as they intersect with race and healthcare. A few of these topics include:

-Access to healthcare innovation

-Telehealth medicine

-Reproductive rights

-Eugenics and CRISPR-Cas9 technology

Speakers:

Sharona Hoffman, Edgar A. Hahn Professor of Law
Carol McCall, Chief Health Analytics Officer at ClosedLoop.ai
Christopher Morten, Columbia Law School
Fabiola Carrión, National Health Law Program
Peyten Sharp, Akin Gump
Dayna Bowen Matthew, George Washington University Law School
John Evans, Institute for Practical Ethics at University of California, San Diego
Peter Groeneveld, University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine
Osagie K. Obasogie, University of California
Tahir Amin, I-MAK
Wendy Epstein, DePaul College of Law
Jimmy Sanders, Gunderson Dettmer